57thstreetbooks:

Big ol’ congratulations, high-fives, & champagne toasts to the Best Translated Book Awards Winner & Runners-Up!

WINNER:

SEIOBO THERE BELOW by Laszlo Krasznahorkai, trans. by Ottilie Mulzet, published by newdirectionspublishing

RUNNERS-UP:

THE AFRICAN SHORE by Rodrigo Rey Rosa, trans. by Jeffrey Gray, published by yalepress

A TRUE NOVEL by Minae Mizumura, trans. Juliet Winters Carpenter, published by otherpress

(all titles link to ordering info & summaries!)

57thstreetbooks:

Let’s talk about otherpress​, Pushkin Press, and Stefan Zweig. Other has been all over the news lately as every reviewer and his/her mother jumps on the bandwagon of praise for George Prochnik’s biography of Stefan Zweig, The Impossible Exile (and with good reason). But don’t stop there - dig into Other’s backlist (with a little help from our staff recs) and thank them later. Meanwhile, Pushkin’s been releasing Zweig’s novellas and short stories with style and grace since way before Wes Anderson started talking them up. But why read anything by or about Stefan Zweig, you ask? Because he is your next favorite author. Because his tragedy is the tragedy of the 20th century. Because you need more Zs on your bookshelf. Ok?
otherpress titles:
All Russians Love Birch Trees by Olga Grjasnowa
Your Voice in My Head by Emma Forrest
The Impossible Exile by George Prochnik
The Deep Whatsis by Peter Mattei
The Artificial Silk Girl by Irmgard Keun
Pushkin Press titles:
The Collected Stories of Stefan Zweig
Fear by Stefan Zweig
Burning Secret by Stefan Zweig
Wondrak and Other Stories by Stefan Zweig
Amok and Other Stories by Stefan Zweig
Three Lives: A Biography of Stefan Zweig by Oliver Matuschek

57thstreetbooks:

Let’s talk about otherpress​, Pushkin Press, and Stefan Zweig. Other has been all over the news lately as every reviewer and his/her mother jumps on the bandwagon of praise for George Prochnik’s biography of Stefan Zweig, The Impossible Exile (and with good reason). But don’t stop there - dig into Other’s backlist (with a little help from our staff recs) and thank them later. Meanwhile, Pushkin’s been releasing Zweig’s novellas and short stories with style and grace since way before Wes Anderson started talking them up. But why read anything by or about Stefan Zweig, you ask? Because he is your next favorite author. Because his tragedy is the tragedy of the 20th century. Because you need more Zs on your bookshelf. Ok?

otherpress titles:

All Russians Love Birch Trees by Olga Grjasnowa

Your Voice in My Head by Emma Forrest

The Impossible Exile by George Prochnik

The Deep Whatsis by Peter Mattei

The Artificial Silk Girl by Irmgard Keun

Pushkin Press titles:

The Collected Stories of Stefan Zweig

Fear by Stefan Zweig

Burning Secret by Stefan Zweig

Wondrak and Other Stories by Stefan Zweig

Amok and Other Stories by Stefan Zweig

Three Lives: A Biography of Stefan Zweig by Oliver Matuschek

"I’ll Be Right There is a haunting story of adolescent entanglements that will speak to readers everywhere."

The Independent

"It’s full of murder and sex and magic and spies."

Leah Hager Cohen on Rupert Thomson’s SECRECY

"Stamm powerfully illuminates the ways in which self-preservation too often amounts to nothing more than a life of cynicism, pain and loneliness."

MakeMag

How “The Cancer of War” Alters the DNA of Nations

Public Books — Rebellious Anti-Rebels

As a mature writer and high-profile member of the generation considered the most progressive in modern Korean history, Shin is thinking hard about an old social malaise that continues to plague the present.

Rupert Thomson - Wax, Rhapsodic

virtualmemoriespodcast:

Rupert Thomson talks Secrecy on The Virtual Memories Show

Genre-jumping author Rupert Thomson joins the show to talk about his new novel, Secrecy (Other Press), a 1690’s-based thriller about the Florentine wax-sculptor Zumbo. Along the way, we talk about the arbitrariness of “historical fiction,” the perils of researcher’s…

cloudunbound:

Summer reading could be any kind of book: romance, celebrity tell-all, World War II history, graphic novel. The offerings in international fiction in translation have been too good lately for me not to plug two titles.

Kyung Sook Shin’s I’ll Be Right There (Other Press) focuses on a young South Korean woman’s turbulent coming of age in 1980s South Korea. Loss, love, and literature all play a role. Library Journal's starred review makes clear what a special novel this is from Shin, who won the 2011 Man Asian Literary Prize for Please Look After Mom: “Shin’s searing, immediate prose will remind readers of Nadeem Aslam’s The Blind Man’s Garden, Edwidge Danticat’s The Dew Breaker, and Aminatta Forna’s The Memory of Love, and their stories of ordinary lives trapped in extraordinary sociopolitical circumstances.”

Last Words from Monmartre (NYRB Classics), by the late Taiwanese-born modernist Qui Miaojin, is an epistolary novel with a twist: you can read the letters in any order, per the author, who tells the story of a romance between two young women in Paris, Tokyo, and Taipei. Only 26 when she committed suicide, Qui Miaojin was awarded the China Times Honorary Prize for Literature in 1995. Here’s Publishers Weekly: “It would be wrong to interpret the book’s—or, for that matter, the author’s—ultimate surrender to death as a rejection of the richness of life; rather, like Goethe’s young Werther, this ‘last testament’ (an alternative translation of the title) affirms the power of literature.”

Go forth and summer-read!  

Song of exile

Subtle, prodigiously researched and enduringly human throughout, “The Impossible Exile” is a portrait of a man and of his endless flight. George Prochnik sets about excavating Zweig’s sensibility and psychology as the celebrated writer tried—and failed—to endure the greatest upheaval his native Europe had ever known. “The Impossible Exile” is thus a Zweigean portrait of Zweig, who turns out to be as idealistic as Erasmus, as helpless as Mary Stuart and as delusional as Marie Antoinette.